The correct use of puns

In keeping with the habit of architects to give their buildings stupid names, see Darth Vaders Helmet, the moderately sensible Leadenhall Tower acquired the nickname The Cheesegrater. Some may say calling a building ‘The Cheesegrater’ purely on the basis of one of the sides being slightly sloped is a bit weak, and some may well be right, but these are architects we’re talking about; by their standards that is Oscar Wilde on the form of his life.

This has proved an irresistible target for newspaper sub-editors, alas some of them haven’t quite got the hang of it;

GRATER GOOD TOWER GETS GO-AHEAD.

Honestly I’m not even sure what the Evening Standard was trying to do there, of course I can see the ‘Grater/Greater Good’ part, but damned if I know what that has to do with the rest of the headline. Frankly they should take a hard look at themselves, then go and read the Financial Times for proper cheese grating based puns;

The grater good

Which works perfectly for a story about how the Irish government is using EU social cohesion funding to distribute free cheese. Though be warned, merely being Irish and cheese based makes a pun work, see this horror in the same article;

opposition party Fine Gael’s agriculture spokesman Andrew Doyle said in a statement: “People on the breadline would rather the government’s ‘un-feta’d’ attention was on solving the economic crisis.”

Dear. Lord. No. I fear Mr Doyle used to work for the Evening Standard….

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